• Museum | History

    Museo Ideale Leonardo Da Vinci

Drinking Bacchus | Guido Reni

Connected to the Museo Ideale Leonardo Da Vinci, the Leonardo Museum and the Renaissance of wine was born in 2019.

The building is located in Sant’Ippolito in Valle, in the place that takes its name from the Romanesque church and from the ancient Popolo extended on the banks of the Arno and the torrent that Leonardo called “the river Streda”. It is part of the sixteenth-century complex, formerly owned by the Uguccioni family, descendants of Bernardo di Uguccione di Lippo, Prior of the Arts in Florence in 1444 and of Giovanni Uguccioni husband of Nannina Rucellai, great-grandson of Lorenzo the Magnificent. It includes a chapel originally mentioned in the Bull of Celestine III of 8 June 1152 under the name of the Saints Ippolito and Cassiano.

Restored from scratch and equipped for exhibition purposes with appropriate technologies to host original works, the new museum space will constitute an independent section connected to the Ideal Museum Leonardo Da Vinci, in a typical context of the Tuscan landscape, close to the Etruscan-Roman settlement of Petroio.

Despite the limits of space, it documents Leonardo’s relations with agriculture, which played an important role in his biography and in his studies, starting from childhood, in the context of the paternal family that owned several vineyards and olive groves between Vinci (by his grandfather) and Bacchereto di Carmignano (by his grandmother). The artist-scientist involved it in his technological and nature studies; in fables, prophecies and allegories; in observations on the cultivation of vines from Vigevano to Cesena; and instructions to produce an excellent wine. He also designed several traditional and innovative tools and crushers (philologically and artfully reinterpreted)…

Vinci himself owned several vineyards. Ludovico il Moro gave him a vineyard in Milan at Porta Vercellina, he bought plots of land in Fiesole, and his Uncle Francesco bequeathed his estates near Vinci to him…

In addition to the historical framework linked to the territory of Vinci and Tuscany, the exhibition itinerary proceeds from some archaeological references with discoveries from the Etruscan era, up to the time of the Medici and the Leonardism in the making…